The New Yorker magazine has a piece on the white-power revival, and it’s pretty good. An excerpt:

The far-right revival has largely caught the American public by surprise, but it should not have. After Timothy McVeigh, a supporter of the Patriot movement, carried out the bombing of a federal building in Oklahoma City, in 1995, killing a hundred and sixty-eight people, including nineteen children, domestic radicalism declined. But the McVeigh stigma around the Patriots was not permanent. By 2009, Daryl Johnson, a domestic-terrorism analyst at the Department of Homeland Security, was warning that a slumping economy and the election of the first black President was being used to fuel anti-government sentiment and “the potential emergence of terrorist groups or lone-wolf extremists.” But his report, titled “Right-Wing Extremism,” attracted fierce criticism from Republican lawmakers and conservative commentators, who said it unfairly described legitimate grievances. Johnson’s unit at D.H.S., the Extremism and Radicalization Branch, was dismantled in the years after the 2009 report. Johnson, now a security consultant in Washington, told the Times last week, “The same patterns that led to the growth of the antigovernment groups in the 1990s is being played out today. D.H.S. should be doing more.”

Read the rest here: