Any thoughts? Apparently she's only the 13th woman to have won (out of 106 awards to 110 laureates).

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/11/boo…

I have to admit to not being that familiar with her work since I'm not a huge fan of short stories (I'm sure that's my own failing and nothing to do with short stories as a form). This quote really makes me want to read her stuff and have her change my mind:

Ms. Munro found out about the prize while visiting her daughter in British Columbia who woke her at 4:00 a.m. with the news. Sounding a bit groggy, and at times emotional, she spoke with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation just a few minutes later by telephone. She said, “It just seems impossible. It seems just so splendid a thing to happen, I can’t describe it, it’s more than I can say.” She later added, “I would really hope this would make people see the short story as an important art, not just something you played around with until you got a novel.”

The Atlantic asked her about being called a feminist writer in 2001:

Many of your stories are about women. How do you feel about being called a feminist writer?

Naturally my stories are about women—I'm a woman. I don't know what the term is for men who write mostly about men. I'm not always sure what is meant by "feminist." In the beginning I used to say, well, of course I'm a feminist. But if it means that I follow a kind of feminist theory, or know anything about it, then I'm not. I think I'm a feminist as far as thinking that the experience of women is important. That is really the basis of feminism.

And Jezebel gave a similar quote:

I think I am a feminist politically and in my life, but that's not the purpose of (fiction) writing. You have to go down deep, and you don't start with political stuff."

She started off balancing her writing with homemaking and caring for her three children, and the first story that was written about her in her local newspaper was titled "Housewife Finds Time to Write Short Stories". Lovely.

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And speaking of lovely, here's a photo of her from Margaret Atwood's appreciation of her in the Guardian: