Following the release of Rolling Stone's August 1 cover, tactical photographer Sgt. Sean Murphy of the MA State Police has released police photographs of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev taken during the bomber's arrest.

Included are photos of Tsarnaev emerging from the boat in Watertown, his face and hands bloodied, a sniper's sight trained on his forehead.

Boston magazine has published a selection of the photos in a new article (and plans to publish the rest of them in September) featuring a brief editorial from Sgt. Murphy, who was temporarily relieved of duty for disseminating the photos according to Ian Crouch's nuanced rebuttal in The New Yorker's news blog. Sgt. Murphy's dogma aside, there are all kinds of problems in the Boston article, and I say that as someone who has taken a firmly critical stance against the Rolling Stone cover. Most of them are covered in Crouch's response, and I think this quote sums it up:

"Of course, this kind of speculation, that Murphy’s photos may be the “dangerous” ones, is ultimately as flimsy as Murphy’s assertion that the image of Tsarnaev on Rolling Stone might inspire a wave of homegrown Islamic terrorists to get to work building bombs in their bedrooms. None of these images are dangerous in any clear or sure way—they are simply different pictures of the same person, part of a growing visual record of a moment in history."