On how logistically difficult it’s going to be to repeal and replace Obamacare. Apparently, also, public opinion polls are saying that only about 26% of citizens want to actually do it at this point. So maybe, just maybe (here me out here, don’t squash my optimism!) if the Republicans go ahead forth with this, Democrats stay engaged and mobilized like they are now and are clear with a message, 2018 will cause heads to roll. And since by most accounts the repeal wouldn’t even happen until after that election, maybe it could be stopped.

My chief fear, actually, is just that the Republicans will defy logic and think they’re invincible and just power forward, and at best we’ll have 4-8 years of general turmoil and uncertainty while people go without healthcare, even if the villains are eventually voted out. I mean, how long have some of these guys been masturbating about repealing Obamacare?

One of my other huge fears is that they will successfully repeal and replace it with something identical, and Trump will get credit for it. I think there’s going to be a lot of this kind of thing and one of our duties, which might not sound important but is vital, is going to be to defend Obama’s legacy and keep truth alive. It’s important for our history books but also important because we are seeing the damage that lies do. Can you imagine what happens if in 5, 10 years young white liberals (who maybe don’t remember 2008 very well) don’t think Obama was a president of consequence? Where does that leave people of color? Where does that leave the left?

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My friend shared this on Facebook. I liked it, I mean, as much as any other thinkpiece about why we’re here and what to do. But I liked this about it:

We should promote a militancy all our own, identifiable as leftist, social democratic, or socialist in form and content. Think of this as the continuation of Bernie Sanders’s primary campaign—though we cannot depend on the energy and unexpected charisma of one old man. We need bench strength, which we haven’t had in a long time: many Bernies or, even better, many Michael Harringtons, Norman Thomases, Dorothy Days, and Eugene Debses. In any case, we need men and women speaking the language of the left at meetings, rallies, demonstrations, and marches.

I was an early Bernie supporter but I lost support for him before he had even conceded the primary race. However, what is true is that there is new language of revolution brewing on the left and if it can shed its white male exclusionary identity, I think it will carry us forward.

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