I'm going to preface by saying this: I have no idea how to roll a joint. I have never learned, nor have I ever been in a situation in which I have needed to learn. And I received many responses from joint aficionados who rightly pointed out that I left them off of my first list. This is nothing personal against joints. If that is your preference, then it is indeed a good economical alternative to investing in a larger and more permanent piece. Maybe the day will come where I will need to use that knowledge, but it seems about as likely as me needing to know how to diffuse a ticking bomb.

What I am getting at is that we are allowed to have personal preferences. That is ok, friends! I am just choosing to cater my posts to the person who does not want to settle for the most widely available option. Sometimes even the most ardent fan of Skittles is going to want to invest in some good dark chocolate and vice versa, and that is not a personal attack on Skittles or dark chocolate fans. You can like both or prefer one without affecting the other. What we can all agree on is that most candy is delicious. Sorry, salted licorice, you are the rare exception because I find you gross.

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Now to make up for my oversight I was going to do a little featurette on rolling papers and rolling accessories that are available on the market. After all, there is everything out there from your classic Zig Zag ($3.17) papers, to absinthe ($2.38) and maple syrup ($1.99) flavored papers, papers in different colors ($0.83), and even prints of the American flag ($5.75 for a 3 pack) should you need to quell your latent urges to burn the flag. I don't know your life.

And sure, there are rollers out there that range from the dollar bill method, to the pricier hand made oak rolling machine ($30). But given my extremely limited experience with all of those, I will leave the joint aficionados to their own discussions and suggestions in the comments.

What I really want to discuss today is storage. First thing's first: if you've received your bud in a sandwich baggie, do not leave it in there! You have invested (I am going to assume) a fair amount of money on some quality product, don't just throw it in your pocket or purse to get dried out, jostled and smushed. Plastic bags tend to be full of static, which is essentially breaking down the very potency you are investing in. Bring an airtight/opaque preferably glass container with you for transport, and bring the smallest size to fit your bud so that there won't be room for excess air.

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So what kind of storage are we looking at? While jam jars and tupperware work just fine short term, it's kind of like storing your fine jewelry in an old yogurt container instead of a jewelry box. There's nothing wrong with it, but it might feel a little more like a treat if you put it in something nice.

If you have a temperate dark place you can store your bud such as a low cabinet, your best bet is going to be a simple airtight container such as these cork top glass jars. It's simple, affordable, and the design keeps everything fresh in a clean attractive case. The one I linked to is for 30 jars for $37.20, but it is just as easy to find these jars at any kitchen supply or craft store for $1-$2 each.

Lets say you're not looking for the most basic option, and you would like something that is both more light resistant and aesthetically pleasing. The key is to find something that looks good on a shelf next to the rest of your stuff. I would suggest staying away from anything with a pot leaf emblazoned on the front, because it's not like you need a reminder of what's inside.

Your best best for long term storage if you plan on leaving it outside of a cabinet is a bio photonic glass jar ($35 for 250ml). These jars are light resistant, customizable, and airtight. There are a lot of retailers out there who have these jars for purchase with their logos on them at an inflated price, but just go to the source and request an etching to make it uniquely yours. Dragons, a Tardis, your cat, they'll do the sand etching for you.

Humidors ($44.95) are another attractive option, as they are made to hold tobacco in the same environment as well maintained weed. Not to mention a humidor alludes to the heyday of the Rat Pack and tuxedos. Light up while listening to a little Frank Sinatra, it's pretty delightful!

The simplest option is the one I personally use, which is a black, cork topped, ceramic container ($18) inside of a decorative box ($28.50). The box is kept on a shelf away from extreme temperatures or humidity, and is not near any appliances that give off heat. It's a pretty design, discreet, and still easily accessible. After all, the best way to hide anything is to hide it in plain sight.

But say you are traveling with your glassware. You're going to need to keep it safe, so keep it safe in style. This roll up leather pipe pouch ($65) was mentioned in comments of the last post, and I could not agree more with the suggestion. But if you need something a little simpler, there are padded pouches that can be anything from a solid neutral ($10) to a whimsical print ($13). And if you really need nice place to store your larger piece, thesewood burned egg foam cases ($75) are a beautiful option.

And joint rollers, I didn't forget you again! In fact, I'm a little jealous of the array ($50) of cigarette ($20) cases ($36.50) there are available. Just be sure you inspect the cases closely for any broken elastic or rust, which could effect the quality of your joints.

Remember, these are things to invest in. Yogurt containers and jam jars are fine if that's your only option, but try to treat yourself to a quality experience.

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These posts are 100% not sponsored by anyone and I am getting paid a grand total of $0 to endorse anything. It tickles me greatly that any of you think I'm making any money off of this. Top image via Etsy.com.