Like commenting on the main page.

That movie theatre jungle gym post and the comments made me mad as hell, so I wrote a long ass rant and I know I’m going to hate myself for it, because I always hate myself for posting on the Jez main page as soon as I get replies.

I mean, there’s usually a few replies that show some actual thought and willingness to consider a new point of view. But a lot usually serve no other purpose than to remind me that the Jez commenters are NOT like the GT commenters.

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My comment is below. But seriously.

Things worthy of outraged think pieces on the internet: nazis, anti-trans bathroom bills, the current state of health care, the uptick in racist and anti-Semitic crimes, the sexist and whitewashed media.

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Things NOT worthy of outraged think pieces on the internet: businesses that choose to offer services that you don’t personally need but could be extremely helpful to many people.

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And yeah, you could argue there’s some irony in my writing an outraged think-piece style comment about an outraged think-piece about a topic like this, but I think the difference is that my outrage has to do with the hostility thrown around about this idea and the assumptions about the families that would use it (spoiled brats). The virulent rhetoric people are lobbing around actually affects people who would benefit from things like this.

It’s kind of like when people make fun of those “As Seen on TV” products, a great number of which were originally invented to benefit people with disabilities. Take, for example, the Snuggie. It is ideal for wheelchair users! But a bunch of people who didn’t personally see a need for them decided they weren’t just silly, but worthy of scorn and mocked them and anybody using them. That kind of mockery actually affects people.

I mean, we already live in a world so ableist that people who actually need and would greatly benefit from using, for example, mobility devices, will refrain from doing so because of how they’re looked at and treated and thought of.

So when people talk about a business offering a service that could benefit people (whether it’s due to financial, disability, or other needs) as if it’s the worst thing ever and only bad parents could possibly want to use it, it actually matters.