Ok, so my initial response to this FB post was glib, but now I want to flesh it out by riding this train of thought as far as it’ll go.

My immediate gut response was: because they’re different. Gender identity =/= racial identity. Duh. And Rachel Dolezal’s claims just felt... inauthentic to me. A judgement call, I know, but it just didn’t sit right. Her trials and tribulations of ‘being Black’ didn’t compare to the experiences of trans people (lest we forget that at least some of the predjudice Dolezal experienced was faked).

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So in order to back up this idea, we need to determine why they’re different. And well, I believe it’s because: the stereotypes and beliefs about different racial groups are 99% socially-generated; that is, they are a purely human cultural creation, and have no basis in biology or science. I’m no PubMed expert, but I’m willing to bet there are no significant genetic differences across races that could account for the huge disparities in cultural perception of different races’ abilities, personalities, etc.

Whereas gender, while I concede has a huge cultural component—particularly with regards to gender expression—is much more closely tied to biology and genes, and thus much more “hardwired” in a person’s consciousness. I don’t want this to be misconstrued as an argument against trans people (i.e. “it isn’t natural!” shut up.); I simply believe it is more likely, biologically, for one to have a strong identity attachment to a certain gender than to a certain race. Or, more simply: race is a construct, (biological) sex is a reality, gender is a construct extrapolated from that reality. Ultimately, I believe that humans can, due to altered levels of hormones or different genes or any other number of biological factors, identify with a different gender than their body presents. I do not believe that racial identity is rooted in genes or hormones or cells, but in society and its treatment of people who look different from oneself.

Does that answer your question, bro?