This piece by Olga Khazan at the Atlantic sums up results from a survey by the Kaiser Foundation on women and healthcare — specifically, the article focuses on the reasons why women don't seek healthcare in cases where they should (which women do more frequently than men). Cost barriers are part of the story, and can be alleviated by insurance coverage, but there are lots of other reasons why women are likely to delay care — and those reasons will be devilishly complicated to address.

Three of the key hurdles captured in the survey are the fact that women living in poverty are likely to struggle getting off work, finding childcare, and arranging transportation for medical care. While these results might seem like a "no duh" finding, they point a clear finger toward the fact that improving healthcare — including getting people preventative care before minor/moderate problems (less expensive) become major, costly problems — is much more complicated than reforming insurance. It will require us to think about public transportation, workers' rights, childcare, education, hunger, etc. This is a multifaceted problem and requires systematic, clear-eyed discussion and action — it can't just be fixed on one front. I'm hoping that results like these being put, repeatedly, into the public conversation will help spark some utilitarian conversations about how to keep costs down and make the system more effective and efficient.

What do you guys think?