Sometimes, when I'm feeling down about the 2013 world, I like to dig up my April 1972 Cosmo and read a random article to make myself feel better.

This one is a gem and I would like to share it with you all, and encourage you to take the quiz and find out if you are "Madam President" material or if you should just stick to more appropriate lady stuff.

Quiz

Could you be PRESIDENT?

by Ernest Dichter, Ph.D.

A female President? The average voter (women included) would have scoffed at this idea ten years ago, but today the possibility seems very real. As the 1972 presidential election approaches, at least two women—New York Representatives Shirley Chisholm and Bella Abzug—are being seriously mentioned as potential candidates, and Mrs. Chisholm insists that she is in the presidential race. Voter acceptance of women in politics is increasing every year and perhaps one day soon we will have a "Madam President."

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Suppose you were running for the Presidency (or were the adviser to a female candidate). What ideas and arguments, as outlined in this quiz, would you choose to sell yourself to the electorate? Check off your answers, then turn to the scoring section at the end of the quiz to see how good a campaigner you would be.

1. Many male voters, and some female voters, feel that women are fickle, emotional, and cannot make fast decisions. How would you counteract this feeling in your political campaign?

  • A. By talking about Catherine the Great, Queen Elizabeth, Queen Victoria, Golda Meir, Indira Gandhi, and other women leaders who have been responsible for making momentous decisions.
  • B. By quoting your own political record and citing the cases where you made good decisions despite your sex.
  • C. By stressing the fact that women spend most of the money, take care of family budgets, and, to a large extent, are responsible for the education and planning of their children's lives, and thus are capable of making decisions.
  • D. By showing how you would have tackled some of the problems that have faced the nation over the last six years and solved them with feminine flair and finesse.

2. In trying to persuade the public to vote for a female candidate you would emphasize the fact that:

  • A. Women are more resilient emotionally than men and more able to endure suffering, stress, and crises.
  • B. Women are mothers and wives and have more of an understanding of human problems than men do.
  • C. You have had a lot of political experience in settling disputes on a community level.
  • D. As a woman you have learned to please many different types of people.

3. The idea that a woman does not understand business and the economy of the nation is a possible attack against a female candidate. "Not true," you will say, because:

  • A. Inflation and similar problems affect women first. You know all about them as a mother and shopper and are intelligent enough to translate your expertise into larger issues.
  • B. You took special courses in governmental finances.
  • C. Governmental finance problems are not very different from family finance problems; they are just on a larger scale.
  • D. You have already selected highly qualified advisers for your Administration.

4. A good-looking candidate stresses this fact in her campaign by:

  • A. Dressing with taste and elegance.
  • B. Pointing out that not only is she intelligent and capable, but as an attractive woman will have a special advantage in dealing with (male) heads of state, politicians, etc.
  • C. Dressing well, but inconspicuously, so as not to arouse the envy of women voters.
  • D. Appearing as often as possible at social events when she will be seen and photographed and where important people will have a chance to meet her.

5. Antagonists might use the argument that Madam President would be at a disadvantage representing the U.S. vis-a-vis other nations, because she would be too visionary and impractical. She should answer that:

  • A. On the contrary, women are usually much more practical than men.
  • B. Women are more visionary, but vision is exactly what is needed in our rapidly changing world.
  • C. She is versatile and can adapt herself to changing circumstances.
  • D. She would downplay visionary aspects but use flair and good taste to help get the decisions of her male Cabinet ministers across.

6. How would you as a female candidate combat the fear that the U.S. never had a woman President and might actually be ridiculed by other nations?

  • A. Appeal primarily to women, reminding them that their time has come.
  • B. Use mythology and history as a helper. The Goddess of Wisdom and the Goddess of Justice were women. The symbol of liberty is a woman. Woman helped conquer the West, and Queens Elizabeth I and Victoria were strong and respected leaders.
  • C. Point out that the U.S. (along with India and Israel) would be admired for having elected a woman and put herself again in the lead of new and creative political thinking.
  • D. Stress the fact that the U.S. needs a woman to help solve problems such as pollution, the health-care crisis, improvement of schools, etc.

7. How would you deal with the argument that a woman President would be too tolerant, not militant enough, to defend U.S. interests?

  • A. Recall some of the famous women who have shown outstanding courage—Joan of Arc, Golda Meir, Eleanor Roosevelt, Margaret Sanger, Clara Barton, etc.
  • B. Say that today's nations resemble more a family of nations; therefore we need a leader who can establish harmony.
  • C. Point out that women are stubborn and know how to defend their point of view.
  • D. In a TV debate, prove how tough you can be against an articulate male opponent.

8. The Women's Lib movement has stressed the fact of equality between men and women. Would you, therefore:

  • A. Stress that anything a man can do, you can do, too?
  • B. Be yourself, without trying to project a tough "image"?
  • C. Appeal to the voters by charming them with your feminine wiles and sexiness?
  • D. Be an aggressive feminist and campaign on a women's rights platform?

SCORING
Find the point values for the answers you checked. Then add up your total score.
1.

  • a—1
  • b—4
  • c—2
  • d—3

2.

  • a—1
  • b—2
  • c—4
  • d—3

3.

  • a—2
  • b—4
  • c—3
  • d—1

4.

  • a—2
  • b—3
  • c—4
  • d—1

5.

  • a—1
  • b—2
  • c—4
  • d—3

6.

  • a—2
  • b—1
  • c—4
  • d—3

7.

  • a—1
  • b—4
  • c—3
  • d—2

8.

  • a—3
  • b—4
  • c—2
  • d—1

24 to 32: You have an excellent chance to gain the White House! You chose answers that were honest and straight forward, without making a major item of your femininity or attacking (and thus antagonizing) men.
17 to 23: Your prospects are only fair. Probably you would tend to rely on arguments which seem impressive (citing historical precedents, making rhetorical appeals to noble emotions, etc.) but which in actual fact do not have much personal impact on voters.
8-16: Your prospects are poor. Too often you would choose aggressive positions or overly obvious campaign ploys. This sort of "planned" approach has succeeded in the past, but would not have much appeal today, especially to younger people whose votes will be so crucial in 1972 and 1974.

FIN.

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So, how'd ya'll do? Do you ever feel like there are no right answers? That's kinda how I feel. Here's a bonus douche ad! Cupid's Quiver, Raspberry Douche.