Many people consider that the defining moment of last year’s Canadian Federal election was when the Conservatives rolled out a scheme to set up a “barbaric cultural practices” snitch line, where people could report on their neighbours. The idea was heavily rejected, and is thought to have been a factor in one of the MPs who made the announcement, Chris Alexander, losing his seat. The other MP who made the announcement, Kellie Leitch managed to hang on to her seat, but was contrite about her role in the announcement after the election.

Then she started running for the leadership of the Conservative Party. Apparently her team learned absolutely nothing, because they sent out a survey to their supporters asking if Canada should screen potential immigrants for “antiCanadian values”.

Here’s my take:

In 1786 in the aftermath of the American Revolution, Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe invited Mennonites and Quakers to come and settle in Canada on the promise of exemption from military service. As pacifists, it was thought they would make good settlers, who wouldn’t revolt against the Crown.

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Fast forward to 1922 when the Canadian government banned Mennonites, Hutterites and Doukobours from immigrating to Canada, because as pacifists, their beliefs were considered contrary to Canadian values.

This is why you don’t let governments define what “antiCanadian values” are.

ETA: Forgot to put in an article link before.