A bakery in Colorado has been hit with a discrimination complaint... for refusing to decorate a wedding cake with anti-gay messages.

Now, this is obviously in response to the Colorado Civil Rights Commission saying another bakery was guilty of discrimination by refusing to make a cake for a same sex wedding. The customer was obviously a giant ass about it and was looking to pick a fight - he clearly knew he'd be refused.

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However - in light on the CCRC ruling that refusing to sell a wedding cake for a same sex couple is discrimination.. can't the same be said for refusing to decorate a cake with wording you have moral objections to? The wording the baker gave is pretty much exactly what the anti-gay bigots say:

[...] she would be devastated to release a cake via the bakery with such a hateful message fashioned by her own hands.

Now, in the bakers shoes I also wouldn't be comfortable making and selling a cake like this (especially give you can bet money that this asshole would go around making sure everyone knew what bakery sold it), and I support the CCRC ruling against the bakery that refused the same sex couple. But are these two positions something I can hold at the same time? Or am I just justifying it because in this case I disagree with the person wanting the cake, and I agree with the same sex couple that wanted a cake? And, legally, is there a distinction between the two?

EDIT TO ADD:

Maybe this is how to look at it - she did sell them a cake, she just refused to decorate it with something that was hateful to any particular group of people. Whereas the other bakery refused to even sell the cake to a same sex couple. If the same sex couple had wanted a cake decorated with "Straight people deserve to die", then that too would be bad and not fall under the protected class protection.

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