The New Yorker published a piece the other day by a Harvard law professor. She writes that many of her colleagues have chosen not to teach this topic because of all the potential trigger issues that surround it (among other things). I find myself mostly agreeing with her that this is an uncomfortable topic but one that needs to be discussed and taught. Are there going to be some law students who will be triggered by class discussions or exam questions? Probably. But I don't think that ignoring a whole section of case law is the solution.

I guess this goes to my discomfort over trigger warnings in general*. They are absolutely warranted in many cases but there is a point when insulating yourself or others from certain realities becomes counterproductive. In my mind I liken it to the way many medical schools have simply dropped abortion from their teaching schedule. Yes, it's a controversial procedure (for some people), but if someone is having a incomplete miscarriage or is in danger of dying from a pregnancy complication her doctor damn well better know the procedure to treat her. (Thankfully some med students are fighting back against this trend now - yay!)

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*I didn't put a trigger warning on this post. Since the post is not discussing a specific incident or describing a trauma I didn't think it needed a warning. I'd be curious to hear in comments if people disagree with this.