TW weight loss, disordered eating

I read this article in livescience on Thursday and it made me really frustrated and sad. I’m still thinking it over in my head, and I figured out what got me.

It was interesting in that apparently there is this registry for people who have lost more than 30 lbs and kept it off for more than a year. They looked at what these people did that caused long-term success, since most of us tend to yo-yo diet for however many years.

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But when they described the long-term success strategies, I realized it sounds like an eating disorder. Certainly disordered eating at least. Let me sum up some of the high points:

60-70 mins of moderate activity, 6 days a week (okay, that’s definitely reasonable and good for you)

Consume 1380 calories a day, with no more than 30% from fat - fyi the article claims later that men on average eat 420 calories a day more than women, but doesn’t clarify if that 1380 is an average or a median. So maybe women in the registry are eating around 1160 calories a day and men are eating 1600 calories a day? (what the hell that is not a lot of calories, especially with the exercise)

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Eat the same foods, rarely deviating from “safe” foods - direct quote “when people eat the same foods over and over, they become less excited by the foods, and so eat less of them” (hyper-focus on food choices, that can be obsessive and problematic)

“Exert high levels of control over eating” - direct quote! (WTF)

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There were very good points about always eating breakfast, etc, too. It’s just if someone I didn’t know/didn’t know well told me they were doing the things listed above, I would be concerned they have disordered eating. It makes me think about how people only thing really really thin people (generally women) can have eating disorders (binge-eating notwithstanding). Like, if I eat a small salad for lunch it’s a good thing - it’s me “taking control” of my health, but if a really thin coworker does it, people comment that she needs to eat more. No one knows what other things either of us has eaten, nor our reasons for eating as we do. But that presumption remains.