I honestly think this stuff matters.

I subbed at the city preschool today for the music teacher who took the position I filled in for all fall. (You know, the position that should have been mine, except nepotism? Yeah, that one. *eye roll*) He had me help prepare them for their spring concert (sure, fine, no prob!) which has a colors theme. Awwwwww....... (Quick aside: The fact that there is a colors theme, about 30-40% of the kids in the school come from homes where Spanish is the primary language, and they're NOT doing Des Colores really irks me as well. I mean, that song is extremely well known, and I KNOW there is a simple enough arrangement of it in the resources he used for the rest of the songs, but I digress and that's a battle I'll be fighting in this area for a loooooooong time. *sigh*.)

One of the songs lists the colors of the spectrum. Great. Actual ROY G BIV. Awesome. There were a bunch of colored cards on sticks, presumably for the kids to wave as each color is listed. There's a red, and an orange, and yellow, and green, and dark purpley blue, and a light purple, and a PINK!!???? WTF??????? As I go through the colors with the kids, my suspicions are confirmed: They call the dark purpley blue "blue," the light purple "indigo" and the pink "violet."

I had to leave him a note. I just couldn't not be that person. I don't care that these kids are preschoolers. I don't care that finding distinct blue, indigo, and violet construction paper is hard. BUT YOU DO NOT GIVE CHILDREN INACCURATE INFORMATION. Just don't do it. Simplify for them, yes. Use earlier models that are less complex and nuanced so that they can get a basic understanding before building up to the more complicated ideas, yes. BUT DO NOT TELL THEM WRONG THINGS. EVER.

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I mean, really, he could have just used the dark blue as indigo, the purple as violet, and gotten a robin's egg blue for the blue. Robin's egg blue is super easy to find, even in construction paper.