...is this:

I’ll mostly let it speak for itself. Here’s a choice quote:

Blaming a company’s clothing for teenagers’ self-esteem issues is missing the point. The fashion industry, in general, from high-end to fast fashion uses imagery that consumers want to identify with: happy people, attractive women and a comfortable lifestyle. Is it the fashion, TV or movie industry to blame for girls feeling fat? To some degree, of course, but what can have a bigger impact are family values and character building. Raising confident girls that don’t feel the need to use a lot of makeup or buy new clothes every week to feel good or accepted is a hard job when they are being bombarded with airbrushed photos, Instagram feeds and videos featuring “perfect” bodies and faces, but blaming private enterprise is not the solution to a crisis of values.

Why can’t those girls just say: “this doesn’t fit me” and move on? Why is it so important to wear what “everybody” is wearing?

Stupid complainers, why can’t you just accept that clothes aren’t FOR YOU. Clothes are for thin people. Wear a rug or something. Don’t blame every industry on the planet for showing only one very small segment of the population and pretending that’s what everyone should look and act like.

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The writer does get one thing right: fat is an adjective, it doesn’t have to be (and shouldn’t be, but whatever) morally negative. She seems a bit lost, however, as to when it might not be negative...

Thus, there are measurable ways to categorize someone as fat or obese and there could be different measurement methods, but the takeaway is that “fat” is just a word to refer to your body mass index. Social perception of obesity is a different concept, according to research at the University of Alberta shows that when a thin person is seen lying down watching television, people assume they’re resting, but when people see an overweight person relaxing, it’s automatically assumed they’re lazy and unmotivated. Whether those social perceptions are fair or realistic is not for me to assess, but the fact that the word “fat” has negative connotations does not erase the fact that it is just a word and not an insult, as some media outlets imply.

I haven’t used this one in awhile but: LOL.

She even asks this burning question...

If obesity is such a negative condition, why does the media seem to sympathize more and more with the idea that being overweight is good?

(Italics hers.)

If by “good” she means some limited segments of the media are beginning to report that bodies of more sizes can be valued and that it’s a shitty thing to act like a shit to someone, even if — le gasp! — that person is a fat person, then... maybe? Because I’m still not seeing very many body positive portrayals of fat women in popular media.

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This is just a dumb thing I read and it pissed me off and now I’m sharing it. It is so dumb. That is all.

ETA The dumbness extends to Twitter! #womenagainstfeminism ????