I wasn't able to get a ride to Bill's Pharmacy this morning to get my drink, so I had to call a cab to drive my crippled ass there. I got into the cab, told him my destination and pulled out my phone to mess around on while he drove. About a third of the way there he turns into the parking lot of the Rexall Pharmacy nearby and puts the car in park. Confused at why he's stopping, I ask:

Me: "Did you need to stop here first or something?"
Driver: "Um, no, you wanted to go to the pharmacy, so here we are!"
Me: "Oh...Sorry, no, I said Bill's Pharmacy, not Rexall... I need to get my Methadone"
Driver: "Oh. OH! Wow, you just really don't look anything at all like the type of person I'd usually be driving to Bill's Pharmacy... so I just assumed you meant this Pharmacy instead".

His words weren't anything new, I've heard them many times before, from many different people. Due to the fact that I apparently look a certain way, people are often quite shocked to hear I've experienced the addiction I have. Because a relatively attractive, well spoken young woman couldn't possibly have been an IV drug user, right!?

Advertisement

Wrong. So wrong. Addiction can effect absolutely anyone, regardless of appearance. It can be the homeless man shooting up in an alley, or a wealthy business man snorting lines in the bathroom at work. I'm quite confused by what these people imagine when they think of a typical addict. How people treat me can change very quickly depending on whether or not I choose to divulge the fact that I'm a recovering IV drug user. It's almost as though I have this disguise or mask I can take on and off as I see fit.

If I'm open about my past I'm often seen as the dirty former IV drug user that you'd want nothing to do with. But when if put on my mask and shut my mouth, no one would ever know what's hidden underneath. Then all they see is the pretty disguise...

...and fail to ever see the real 'me'...