I am getting really tired of the near-fanatical worship of science that exists in geek culture, at least the geek culture that I fit into. Science is awesome, and the things that we are able to explain through astronomy, physics, and biology are fascinating. BUT I feel it's expected now that to be a geek, you automatically have to be into the sciences (and not those shitty soft sciences, now, HARD sciences). I can't just enjoy my fantasy books and movies or read my comics, I also have to apply the scientific method to everything and like "I Fucking Love Science" posts on Facebook.

These feelings started in college. I was in a very large social club that involved all things geeky: sci-fi, fantasy, anime, comics, gaming, horror, you name it. I made some great friendships in that group that still last to this day, so my experience was overall very enjoyable in that group. I was even an officer for a few years. But a lot of people in that group were in computer science and engineering, who continuously made fun of Liberal Arts and Social Science majors. I was in a demanding double major in International Relations and Economics, learning French, and required to study abroad and write a thesis by the end of the program. If I ever complained about how difficult my classes were, other members would scoff and make jokes. I constantly felt like I had to prove my academic credentials to really belong in the group.

Now, I still feel that the idea of science being of greater worth than other fields is prevalent in the geek community, and I get vaguely (note that qualifier) sexist vibes from this trend. Since so-called hard sciences attract more men, they are "good." Fields that attract more women, like psychology, sociology, communications, are "not real."

I'm not sure I expressed myself very well, but it's been bothering me. This experience might be limited to the groups I run with, so please don't take this as some huge generalization of all geeks. Like I said, I think science is great, I just wish that being into politics, the arts, etc. was a little more welcome among the geek communities I'm involved with.