A town where the entire population is made up of young women has made an appeal for single men - but only those willing to live by female rules....

Over 600 women make up the population of Noiva do Cordeiro, southeast Brazil - most aged between 20 and 35.

Although some are married with families, their husbands are made to work away from home, only being allowed to return at weekends.

Sons are sent away when they reach 18 and no other men are permitted to live in the town, which sits in a remote valley 60 miles east of Belo Horizonte.

The settlement dates back to the 1890s, when a young woman and her family were excommunicated from the Catholic church after she was accused of adultery.

Slowly more single women and mother-only families joined the community, and over the decades several attempts by men to intervere in their way of life made them adopt a strictly 'no male' policy.

Today, girl power rules in the rural town, with women in charge of every aspect of life - from farming to town planning and even religion.

When Anisio died in 1995, the women decided never again to let a man dictate how they should live.One of the first things they did was to dismantle the male-biased organised religion he had set up.

Ms Fernandes said: "There are lots of things that women do better than men. Our town is prettier, more organised, and far more harmonious than if men were in charge.

"When problems or disputes arise, we resolve them in a woman's way, trying to find consensus rather than conflict.

"We share everything, even the land we work on. Nobody competes with anyone here. It's all for one, and one for all.

"The whole town came together recently to help buy a huge widescreen TV for our community centre so we can all watch soap operas together.

"And there's always time to stop and gossip, try on each other's clothes and do each other's hair and nails."

(h/t ImPerfectStranger) It appears that it is a mischaracterization

While the town's origins are authentic—Maria Senhorinha de Lima really did get excommunicated and helped to found the town, and the men of the town do leave during the week to work in local factories—several British news outlets such as The Mirror have misrepresented the facts. The town's population is closer to 300, for example, and the gender breakdown is reportedly much more equal. Rosalee Fernandes also says that she did not give an interview to anyone about the town, although one of the Internal reporters who broke the story still insists that he spoke with villagers in person.

Onlookers seem to believe that the false reports' origins are rooted in an earlier rumor that the town was home to a large brothel.

Advertisement