Good Monday Morning People! Essay for my Fairy Tale class is due tomorrow. I've got all my notes ready, quotes, etc. Now I need to write the damn thing. So I need a little assistance with my thesis statement please (once that's sorted I'll be fine for the rest). The teacher requires us to write formally and we are using MLA citations (if this is of any help). So I'm going to post my opening first and after that I'll post the (guiding) questions. I do this because I need to make sure that the statement makes sense. I want to see if you understand the point I'm making. Any criticism is welcome! A few extra deets: Topic is Little Red Riding Hood, I've chosen Roald Dahl's version. We examined the otherworldly, morality, transformation, woman/adulthood, innocence, and the grandmother archetype. So the essay is within that context. This also an analytical essay and requires a "close reading" I need only examine one passage for the essay.

Most readers are quite familiar with the harrowing tale of the young woman who meets with danger in the woods, so much so that I hardly have to name that infamous Red Riding Hood tale. The cheeky children’s writer, Roald Dahl, can be counted among the knowledgeable . Apparently enough of a fan to spin his own version turning the tale on itself and transforming it from the saga of an innocent maiden thrust into the unknown to be a victim of beastly predator into a poem of the trials and triumph of a girl turned heroic woman. Gone is the great danger of the wolf and the passivity of Little Red. Gone, even, is “Once upon a time”. Instead Dahl has written a modern tale of initiation and triumph one that blurs the line between the real and fantasy and breaks the rules of the otherworld. Red Riding Hood is no timid victim but a heroine brandishing a weapon!

I’m going to focus on the final passage of the Roald Dahl’s Little Red Riding Hood poem because it excellently demonstrates how the themes of Red Riding Hood remain universal despite the mocking modernization which he treats the story with. In fact Roald Dahl so encompassed the central element of transformation that not only do the characters go through change but so does the structure of the story; becoming more mature through its modernization.

I am tweaking that last sentence, it's a bit...stunted. Doesn't flow. Now the teacher wants us to examine the text in context of the basic elements (other world, transformation, innocence lost) of the Riding Hood story, we need to look at what elements the author highlighted, what is significant about those elements, the method (poem) that the elements are presented, and how the highlighted elements affect the meaning of the story (becomes modern). So, does my statement make these points? Or am I out in left field.

I used the final passage btw:

``That's wrong!'' cried Wolf. ``Have you forgot
To tell me what BIG TEETH I've got?
Ah well, no matter what you say,
I'm going to eat you anyway.''
The small girl smiles. One eyelid flickers.
She whips a pistol from her knickers.
She aims it at the creature's head
And bang bang bang, she shoots him dead.
A few weeks later, in the wood,
I came across Miss Riding Hood.
But what a change! No cloak of red,
No silly hood upon her head.
She said, ``Hello, and do please note
My lovely furry wolfskin coat.''