Hold on to your corsets and bonnets, ladies! Mark Judge has the ultimate, fool-proof, new, and innovative solution to stop catcalling before it begins: just be nice to guys when you turn them down. I know, right? Until today, I'd never heard of this suggestion either!

We've all seen it—at bars, in clubs, at parties. A dude screws up the nerve to take that long walk across the room and ask a woman for her number or out for a date. For classy and polite ladies, the reply is a simple no-thank-you. Something like: "Thank you, I appreciate the interest, but I'm seeing someone right now." Or: "I'm flattered, but I have some other things I'm focusing on now." Yet for too many women, raised like the boorish catcallers, without the verbal social skills that allow for pleasant interaction, graciousness is just too much to ask for.

Where to begin?

Judge conveniently ignores the centuries-long socialization of young girls and how we're expected to be nice and accommodating all the time. There's even a whole organization and guide about how nice we're supposed to be so we can get what we want. Of course, if we end up actually stating what we want, like Judge wants us to, we can still get penalized.

But let's pretend women are a bunch of idiots who never tried Judge's solution before.

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Women have shared many of their experiences when directly turning a man down. Responses range from tantrums to getting an invoice for relationship-related costs to taking a Boston hit song too literally to getting fatally stabbed. At some point, going the direct let down route, only to be called a bitch and/or subject to threatening behavior, will condition a person to avoid it.

Here's an idea. If you have a suggestion that so utterly goddamn obvious and simple to an chronic problem, before you open your mouth, maybe understand that there's already a reason your "amazing" solution doesn't work. (Judge's idiotic suggestion is on par with the idiots who tell infertile couples to go adopt.)

Rather than delve into the complicated and ingrained behavior of women who justifiably do not feel comfortable rejecting men outright, Judge ironically misses the point. If he really cared about both genders' feelings in the mating game, he'd realize that most women do not want to play emotional roulette with a man they barely know, especially when (not if) they've tried the "gracious" route before and been burned.

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Or better yet, Judge should actually talk to some women about his "helpful suggestion" and see what kind of reactions he gets before peddling it to us as though it's an undeniable truth that no one else ever thought of before.

EDIT: Here's a fantastic idea from commenter, Scavengersdaughter, for what Judge should be writing about instead:

Where's his advice to men on how to graciously accept a polite rejection?