Today on Pmag, we ran a post by Coco on the UCSB shooting, in which we embedded some of our favorite tweets. It picked up some steam, so I decided to experiment with the boost feature on Facebook. Boosting a post means it can be seen by more than a tiny fraction of fans, but it costs money. Pmag had a good month last month, so I threw a little money at Facebook to boost it. It's a great post, we want people to see it.

Well, Facebook decided our post did not fit their guidelines.

The text reads "Your Post wasn't boosted because it violates Facebook's ad guidelines by advertising adult products or services, including toys, videos or sexual enhancement products. The post remains published, but it is not running as an ad."

While Persephone Magazine does in fact speak frankly and rather vividly about sex, in our sex related columns, there is nothing in this post, or even surrounding this post (minus a link in the sidebar to our most popular post ever, "Fat Sex: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask." That post isn't porn. I know porn, and that post is not it.) that is anything like porn.

This problem isn't unique to Facebook. We've been kicked out of advertising programs for writing honestly about sex. Google will only send visitors to our sex posts, which it does by the the thousands, while slapping our hands for even mentioning the topic.

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Blocking this post, for this reason, is ridiculous. Had I promoted "What's the Secret to Squirting?" I could see it. But I didn't, and I don't have to, it's gotten thousands of hits a day for three years. Fucking Redbook has a sex advice column, I'm pretty sure Facebook would take their money.

As it turns out, the post did fine on its own, without the magic hand of Facebook or our rather thin wallet getting involved.

I'd still like to know what Facebook thought was too saucy for our own fans to read, however.