And as much as I want to enjoy it my critical class, race, and gender reading is getting in the way:

  • Why is this a book about privileged white kids in Brooklyn? Brooklyn, of all places???
  • Why are almost all the girls blonde?
  • The random kids and professors of color feel shoehorned in and not like real characters
  • Quentin is an annoying privileged fuck. He'd totally get on my nerves in real life. I get that he's depressed but so was I at that age and I wasn't such an annoying fuck
  • All the students sound full of themselves. I was the Alice in that crowd in HS, and I secretly hated the competition, squabbling, and backbiting the advanced kids did. The erudite and slightly colonialist language of the book enforces this (as much as I enjoy big words I like my lit to be a bit more accessible to the masses aka less full of itself)
  • Except for Arabic and Hebrew, the languages and culture studied is very Old and European which feels dismissive of other Magical cultures and history
  • Fillory sounds like a stupid book series
  • They're making fun of HP (and George RR Martin called HP weak tea to this book's Irish whiskey) and as a huge Potterphile I'm butthurt

I probably would've felt the same way about HP if I read it now, but at least Harry has a reason to be an angsty jerk sometimes. Plus that book at least attempts to deal with class and race issues, even if race is substituted for magical status and species-hood.