“What I would like to say to these mayoral candidates is that noise gives you clues about how your system is operating,” Ms. Bronzaft said. She added: “People say that to correct noise you have to spend money. To which I say, by not correcting noise, you’re going to spend more money. Education? Loss in learning. Health? Aren’t health costs one of the major costs of this country? Noise affects health.”

[...]

someone suggested that she examine an elementary school near elevated tracks of the No. 1 line in Inwood, at Manhattan’s northern tip. Some students there were lagging in their studies. What Ms. Bronzaft found, in a widely publicized 1975 study, was that children in classrooms facing the tracks performed far worse than those on the other side of the building, the quieter side.

“Not only were the trains disruptive, the teacher had to stop teaching,” Ms. Bronzaft recalled. “Teachers stopped about 11 percent of the time.”

“Bottom line: By the sixth grade, the children were nearly a year behind those on the quiet side,” she said.

I'm pretty sure I either saw Dr.** Arline Bronzaft speak at my university or one of her colleagues about 4 years ago when I was in my first and most overwhelming year of graduate school.

Source: NYT

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*QOL = quality of life

**PLEASE NOTE that it's Dr. Bronzaft, not Ms.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but it doesn't take an academic to realize that if you're a big-time psychology researcher, you HAVE to have a Ph.D. to get to that point in your career. Sheesh, casual sexism much?