Again it's another one of those times when i'm wrapped up in education, creating my materials and then switching gears and reading something that just doesn't strike me right, but my brain just won't let me put into words why...

Here are some tasty quotes and feel free to help you help me figure out why this has me all annoyed...

But there's an interesting and inevitable translation effect that happens when a Supreme Court justice's 35-page legal argument is condensed into gleeful listicles and 1000-word op-eds: Her words become symbolic battle cries in a larger culture war over contraception, women's bodies, and sexual freedom, rather than a carefully crafted argument in an intensely complicated legal case. In the aftermath of Hobby Lobby,caricatured camps of "liberals" and "conservatives" have obligingly taken their seats and raised their megaphones on either side of a well-worn, abstract debate: sexual freedom vs. sexual purity; women's health vs. religious rights; feminism vs. patriarchy.

But even if that's true, it's also true that certain religious groups regard some forms of contraceptives as morally wrong. This is where simplistic defenses involving the word "science" are misleading; even if the medical community has come to a rough consensus about the definition of conception, there's no way that this consensus can entirely displace or satisfy larger philosophical and religious convictions about the nature of life itself. At its deepest level, this controversy is about competing understandings about the "truth" of human existence. This kind of competition has always been part of life in America, and it probably always will be.

Given this, winning this age-old faux battle between science and faith seems less important than paying attention to where the subtle lines of control and power are drawn. Women need to be able to get birth control, the Supreme Court says, but the government can't make people violate their sincerely held beliefs in order for them to get it. On balance, the Court has decided, certain kinds of companies have the same kinds of religious-freedom rights as people do, and paying for birth-control may legitimately violate someone's conscience. That doesn't make affordable birth-control less important; it's just a layer of nuance affecting how women get it.

And here's her conclusion

In an abstract sense, this case loosely touches on many of the issues that still haunt contemporary feminism: historical ways in which religious principles have been used to control women's bodies; sexual shaming and conservative sexuality morality; economic barriers to reproductive health for low-income women. But in a specific sense, it's an illustration of a relatively new, constructive challenge for feminism: mostly winning history, but occasionally ceding slightly to those who see the world in a different way.

ETA: I have no idea how that tweet got embedded and I can't seem to remove it!! Sorry!! I think i figured it out... testing...