I’m not sure if I should try to summarize this article?

It is definitely worth clicking through. I am crying after reading it.

I’ll try to do a short cut & paste below. Don’t scroll down if you want to avoid spoilers.

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(Also... I’m sorry for the formatting. I am on my phone. If I turn the phone to landscape mode, to get the Kinja formatting options, I am left with 1 line between the keyboard and the top of the frame. I can either see 1 line of text, OR the font options. But not both at the same time. Kinja!

A couple of screenshots are in my reply to this post, below.)

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RIO DE JANEIRO — They were strangers at the starting line, a 24-year-old Dartmouth graduate who barely qualified for these Olympics and an English-born runner who transplanted to New Zealand seven years ago. Less than 20 minutes later, they found themselves eternally linked — by circumstance, by action, by benevolence....

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Hamblin and Abbey D’Agostino, a runner from Topsfield, Mass., collided on the track during the women’s 5,000-meter race. The two seemingly sacrificed any chance at an Olympic medal to help each other reach the finish line, picking each other up, urging each other to continue, pushing each other to the finish.

“I’m never going to forget that moment,” Hamblin said. “When someone asks me what happened in Rio in 20 years’ time, that’s my story.”....

...she crashed onto the blue track and lay there still on her side for a couple of seconds. She thought right away, “What’s hit me? Why am I on the ground?”

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“And then suddenly there’s this hand on my shoulder,” she explained later, “like, ‘Get up, get up! We have to finish this!’ ”

The hand and the voice belonged to D’Agostino. She’d been right on Hamblin’s heels and tumbled over the Kiwi runner, badly twisting her right knee in the process. But D’Agostino popped right up, urging Hamblin to do the same....

....D’Agostino wasn’t about to stay down. Both runners were on their feet and continuing in the race, but the American was clearly hurting. She didn’t make it far before collapsing again. This time Hamblin was there to lend a hand.

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While the leaders raced ahead, both D’Agostino and Hamblin sacrificed valuable seconds to help a competitor. It was instinct, a natural act and something that doesn’t usually earn medals or recognition.

“Everyone wants to win and everyone wants a medal. But as disappointing as this experience is for myself and for Abbey, there’s so much more to this than a medal,” Hamblin said immediately after the race....

Meanwhile, both countries filed a protest on behalf of the runners, contending that the unintentional mishap impacted their result. Race officials agreed. D’Agostino and Hamblin found out after the race that despite being the last two competitors across the finish line, they had advanced and would be allowed to compete in the 5,000-meter final Friday.