I'm fascinated that this is a thing now. Quieter independent films are released via streaming services before or at the same time as in theaters. This makes sense, in helping them to find an audience that isn't in a big city. I like it! I've streamed them before, and was always glad that I did. I found Bachelorette this way, and it has become one of my favorites. Has anyone else noticed this happening? Anyone else taken advantage of it? It's becoming more common, and I'm curious to see how it affects the film industry. How it affects the studio system, specifically. What kind of ripples it makes. Focus Features, Working Title, Mandate Pictures—they love well-made independent films. Anchor Bay is doing this with Jayne Mansfield's Car, and I'm curious to see what happens. With Netflix getting actual mainstream award recognition, streaming has become a thing to genuinely pay attention to, for solid content and a legit audience. There are good things to be seen first on the internet, and distribution companies are recognizing it. I wonder if Fruitvale Station would have done things this way, if it hadn't become so timely that it would get butts in the seats on its own.

Really, I'm just happy quieter movies (not blockbuster-effects movies) are finding new ways to find their audiences. It's really exciting!