Every time Bill Nye raises, in excited tones, a "great mystery," Ham says something like "it's not a mystery, we know the answer, it's in the Bible!" As if it's the cleverest trick. And this, to me, is the most damaging thing about this application of religion: it's anti-curiosity. It says "we know the answers, they're here, and they do not change." My earliest love of science and the scientific method came from being told that there are so many things that we just do not know. I have stood in front of science classrooms and told my students, "We don't know yet!"* and watched them absolutely light up. It's so fundamental to who we are, to keep pushing toward the next answer and the next ten questions that answer drives. I'm not even mad specifically that people won't admit the earth is older than 6000 years — I pity the smallness with which they view the world, but it isn't what angers me. What actually makes me upset is that this kind of thinking teaches people to slow down or stop their critical minds. That there are no more answers to find.

Fuck that. The universe is a incomprehensibly big place and even our planet remains, as of yet, an unsolved mystery. What's so scary about allowing questions to hold their rightful power?

*Specifically, I'm thinking about one time that I was talking about the insanity that is fungal taxonomy, but I didn't figure you guys would be particularly excited about fungi, so I left it in the general. FYI though if you don't think kingdom fungi is cool: fungi are more closely related to animals than plants. :)