So here's a bit of a summation: Goblet of Fire was a good middle. It shows the kids being teenagers, and it also broadens the world to include other schools. It does a lot to transition from the kid-centered early story, with the plots that centered around a kid's life, to the Big Bad of the later story. It finally gives the Big Bad a body that will stick around. Its storytelling style seems a little disjointed to me, in comparison to the previous story. This time, we stick with Harry and see things through his eyes. We experience the story through him, only now, his friends are off having their own stories, which we only check in on when it's important. I was always annoyed that we only got part of the information, but then I suppose the movie would be 5 hours long, so I'm okay with the compromise.

Order of the Phoenix makes me want to read the book. It's my second-favorite stand-alone movie, and it seems so rich, the book would only flesh out my favorite aspects even more. I love that it's the one about railing against a dictatorship. Sometimes overly nice is just a sweet wicked. It makes me feel justified in disliking pink-everything. This was the first one that really stirred up the feels in me. It's political and fantastic. I love Snape in this one, too. Training Harry until Harry sees too much in his mind. Great moments, there.

I love the Half-Blood Prince for reasons I'm pretty sure I'm making up. I adore Draco Malfoy's character arc, but I also feel like I'm projecting a lot onto it. Harry has always seen things in black and white, and doesn't understand the grey. Here's Draco Malfoy, horribly conflicted in grey. He wants to please his parents, and do what he's been taught. He's not very good at it, because he doesn't feel it as deeply as his parents do; he hasn't experienced anything to make him. He is jealous of Harry for getting the attention and for being special. This is Malfoy's chance to be special; people are paying attention to him. He tries to do what he's told, but he isn't very good at it. When someone else gets hurt by his spell, he is wracked with guilt. He sees her again when she's well, and immediately retreats to the bathroom to cry. He rips off his grey sweatervest and stands there, leaning on the bank of sinks, in black and white. Of course, this is where Harry comes in, and instead of talking it out, they just start a shootout that leaves Malfoy bleeding in a puddle. Harry suddenly is the one who hurt someone worse than he intended, and feeling the guilt. He's distrusted Snape the whole time, and in the end, he believes his suspicions to have been proven right. He's still seeing things as one or the other, and not seeing the degrees, even when what he did to Malfoy is clearly at least a shade of grey.

I'm starting the Deathly Hallows now, and I am so stoked!! These are the ones I've really got to pay attention to. It's the climax! It's where allll the good stuff happens.