You probably remember UVA Dean Nicole Eramo, the person responsible for handling sexual misconduct on campus, as the bad guy in the now-discredited Rolling Stone article. This week, she wrote an open letter to Rolling Stone, calling out the magazine for their terrible reporting and selective fact finding. She also chronicles the threats and hate mail she received since the article ran.

I feel a little bad for Eramo. She got dragged through the mud, had words put in her mouth, and never got to tell her side of the story the first time around. Regardless of what she did or didn’t do, no one deserves to be on the receiving end of such venomous anger.

But Eramo still sucks. Maybe not her as a person, but the other school policy she didn’t really try to defend. This video is far more informative than the Rolling Stone article ever was. You see, at UVA, cheating is still an automatic expulsion, while sexual assault remains more loosey goosey.

Here are the best parts:

For every case of sexual misconduct, we always consider whether a student should stay in the community and I think that we are considering those severe punishments, not a expulsion but a two-year suspension with requirements to return is a stiff penalty.

If a person is willing to come forward in that setting and admit that they have violated the policy when there is no, absolutely no, advantage to do so, that deserves some consideration. That they’re willing to say that ‘I’ve done something wrong’ and they recognize that and ‘I’m willing to take my licks and deal with it,’ that’s very important to me.

I don’t think the university is necessarily saying that sexual assault is less important than honor because we don’t expel in every single case. I just don’t buy that at all. I think I’ve already answered your question.

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No, Eramo, that’s exactly what UVA is saying as long as they enforce these two policies.

I understand that she’s only doing her job, but she’s the symbol of everything that’s wrong with UVA’s priorities here. These policies treat a physical crime perpetrated against another person as a lesser offense than not using footnotes.

That’s the truth, no matter what happens to Jackie.