I wanna talk about the things we are missing in the news about the Occupy movement in Hong Kong. Citizens of Hong Kong have taken to the streets by the thousands in protest for democracy and universal suffrage to speak out against Beijing's decision to deny them the right to nominate a leader in 2017, instead leaving the election up to an establishment committee. There have been days of peaceful protest now, and calls for a sit in in the financial district which would effectively shut down one of the busiest cities in the world.

It goes without saying that the relationship between China and Hong Kong has a long history of strain, escalated when Hong Kong was returned to China nearly 20 years ago. China's control over Hong Kong's systems could have major economic effects worldwide, and the citizens of Hong Kong are living in fear of losing the democratic system they have in place now and becoming "just another Chinese city". The news on how much support these protests are getting are conflicting, the co-founder Benny Tai Yiu-Ting told Bloomberg that it's starting to wane. But it's pretty clear this is nowhere near the end, with reports of more protests coming in the next couple of months.

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ETA a quote from Claudia Mo, a Hong Kong legislator and former journalist about what Occupy Central stands for and the differences and similarities it shares with the Occupy Wall Street movement.

" Occupy Central, this idea, I think it was sparked by Occupy Wall Street. And, well, it's not quite—what we're fighting for is not exactly the same. In America, you're fighting against a sort of established capitalism and vested interests, "greed is good" and so on and so forth. But in Hong Kong, we're fighting against this established political might called the Chinese Communist Party. And we use the Central district, which is our CBD, as the equivalent, and we're going to be there to, well, I mean, sort of block traffic and—not exactly to try to scare Beijing, but to show the rest of the world, the international community, that we have loads of grievances, particularly on this political front, and we need international attention on our plight."