My son is kind of a square (an adorable, thoughtful, clever square) and he doesn't know much about pop culture or music that isn't Queen or Journey. Imagine my surprise when we were out walking and we had the following exchange:

Him "Shut up" (That's not the surprising part. That's how we do.)

Me "I don't shut up; I don't do any sort of upping really."

Him "What about when you get up, get, get, get down like that song?"

Oh my gosh. One of those nights where I drink too much wine and teach him about music, via Youtube, allowed Public Enemy to take up space in his brain (the last one brought Janelle Monae onto his radar). I win! I think, in the long run, this will serve him better than all of the secondhand Flavor of Love moments he has been witness to.

ETA: This is a decent article about the hegemony at work in Flavor of Love.

Abstract: This project examines Flavor of Love , a reality based dating show broadcast on Vh1, and its place in the continuum of televised subordination of women , particularly women of color. The study uses concepts of the "male" and "dominate" gaze to explore the interplay of race, gender, and misogyny, and the possible implications on audience perception. Television acts as a powerful socialization agent, and shapes audiences racially stratified and gendered world. Critical discourse analysis provides the rich contextual data necessary to extrapolate the relationship between race and gender inequality 1n reality television. T his article highlights the production of meaning created by a visual cultural storyteller housed within a hegemonic tradition that objectifies and subjugates women of color powerless.