But for her part, Stacia L. Brown makes the case that the rosy reception Nyong'o has been getting throughout this past Hollywood awards season is actually a good omen:

"She is not saddled with centuries of diminishing returns. Accordingly, Lupita is a carefree black girl par excellence — and we have yet to see what the career of a black actress this successful with just one feature-length role under her belt, and this comparatively unburdened by Hollywood's racist legacy, looks like. (Consider other recent black American actress nominees with one role their belts — Quevenzhane Wallis and Gabourey Sidibe — and how their reception in Hollywood and media compares to Lupita Nyong'o's. Neither swanned through her awards season unscathed by racist, appearance-policing coverage — and Sidibe is still the subject of think pieces that actually use their headlines to implore that the public treat her with more respect.)

It is this lack of similar encumbrance — perhaps above all else — that excites me so about Nyong'o. We have yet to see what happens when a privileged black woman begins her acting career with Ivy League theatre pedigree, unchallenged fashion icon status, and an Oscar for her very first role."

Here: http://www.racialicious.com/2014/03/10/fig… Brown and Halliburton's point a little further, the conversation around Nyong'o will give her next major role more heft, and make it seemingly more crucial than the usual post-Oscar turn: if "mainstream" America was willing to fall for her after 12 Years, how willing will it be to follow her to, say, a romantic comedy — not to mention one that wouldn't pair her with an industry-standard White Leading Man?

If she does manage to be cast as Storm, how would Marvel and Fox adjust for her star power opposite X-franchise mainstay Hugh Jackman? What would the reaction be if, like Quvenzhané Wallis inAnnie, Nyong'o was cast in a reimagining of a film once centered around a white character? The emergence of Nyong'o to a public persona akin to "America's Sweetheart" may be setting up an important look at where Hollywood — and its audiences — want to go with their conceptualization of not only beauty, but marketability. Here's hoping Nyong'o can find the best possible path for herself in the midst of it.

She is not saddled with centuries of diminishing returns. Accordingly, Lupita is a carefree black girl par excellence — and we have yet to see what the career of a black actress this successful with just one feature-length role under her belt, and this comparatively unburdened by Hollywood's racist legacy, looks like. (Consider other recent black American actress nominees with one role their belts — Quevenzhane Wallis and Gabourey Sidibe — and how their reception in Hollywood and media compares to Lupita Nyong'o's. Neither swanned through her awards season unscathed by racist, appearance-policing coverage — and Sidibe is still the subject of think pieces that actually use their headlines to implore that the public treat her with more respect.)

It is this lack of similar encumbrance — perhaps above all else — that excites me so about Nyong'o. We have yet to see what happens when a privileged black woman begins her acting career with Ivy League theatre pedigree, unchallenged fashion icon status, and an Oscar for her very first role.

And more in the link—this was their final conclusion. What do you think? They also provide other sides of the argument here as well, including worries about her being objectified, as many people have raised.

Here: http://www.racialicious.com/2014/03/10/fig…