I just got caught up on Doctor Who as far as Netflix goes (only up until the appearance of Twelve). I haven't been as into it since the RTD/Moffat switch happened, and there's been plenty of intelligent commentary around here about reasons for that. But one thing in particular is totally bugging me. (SPOILERS?)

Yes, I think Moffat writes women poorly, yes, I feel like he's always trying to prove how clever he is through his "gotcha!" type writing that I think would belong better in an M. Night Shyamalan movie. But the Angels, you guys. The Weeping Angels.

I adored "Blink". It was smart, it was creepy, it was character-driven, it was good TV. And it firmly established rules for how the Weeping Angels work. They move very fast when not being watched. (Hence, no blinking.) When watched, they freeze. This includes if they are watched by another Angel. So, they tend to cover their eyes when moving, except when closing in on their prey. They get their energy from creating time paradoxes, by sending someone back in time to before they were born.

Apparently, Moffat wrote "Blink". I think he wrote a lot of episodes I liked under RTD's reign. But something went wrong when he became head writer. He must have thought, "Hey, people really liked those Weeping Angels I wrote about before. I should bring those back!" Except he brought them back wrong, and appears to have forgotten about all those rules he established.

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New Angels (fifth season and beyond) seem to all move pretty slow. With lights flashing on and off, people blinking and turning their backs on them, they all only seem to move a foot or two at a time. They never cover their eyes anymore. There are a bunch of times where Angels are facing each other without covering their faces and don't become frozen. These "Lonely Assassins" also have hatched some weirdo plan to all live together in a house with a bunch of people they've sent back in time. Why do they need to live with these people they've sent back, when supposedly they get energy from merely the act of creating the paradox?

They make no sense anymore, I don't find them scary anymore, and it pisses me off. Moffat ruined them.