It's a Blog, Not a Wich Hunt!

I met a guy. I made a sandwich. I started a blog. And I enraged feminists everywhere.

I asked Eric what he thought of the backlash. “I’m reminded of my favorite quote by Andy Warhol: ‘Don’t read your reviews. Weigh them,’ ” he laughed. “Having said that, no sandwiches at all are required for me to marry you and never have been. I already love you and always will.”

My inner Valerie Solanas remains unimpressed.

Some people read into the article too literally — they truly think that if I get to 299 sandwiches, there could actually be a moment there where Eric may say, “Eh, you didn’t make enough steak sandwiches. I’m not sure you deserve a ring!”

The blog started as a lighthearted joke between boyfriend and girlfriend. I presented it to the world because I thought at least one person would find the humor in the idea of sandwiches for an engagement ring.

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Oh, the Internet found humor in it, all right. Just not the sort of humor you intended it to.

This project is not about me promoting myself as some gourmet chef, nor a desperate plot to win Eric’s love — or a movie deal or Internet fame.

It’s an idea that made us laugh and made for a good, lighthearted blog with some drool- inducing sandwich photos.

“300 is a fun, creative project for both of us,” Eric agreed. “We both started from an obviously tongue-firmly-planted-in-cheek joke. I find it nothing short of hilarious and kind of sad that so many people missed that!”

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Look, here's the thing. She didn't just blog, she wrote an entire article about her blog in the New York Post, with an attached, lovingly-planned-out photoshoot. (And she's a senior reporter at NYP, which kind of shocks me, because her reaction makes her seem very New To The Internet.) When you post anything, anywhere, on the internet, you're presenting it for the interpretation of others. The Internet's reaction to it ought to function as an indicator that you are not coming across as jokingly as you intended to. Modify your comedy accordingly. And yes, you did want to make a drool-inducing sandwiches blog. That's totally your right. But "get in the kitchen and make me a sandwich" is coded language that is not being used in a vacuum. It's a little bit disingenuous to clutch your pearls and claim that you had no idea people would take it that way.

Since I’ve launched the blog, E and I have learned a lot about each other besides whether or not he likes tomatoes. We’ve laughed at our mistakes, become more patient with each other’s faults and I’ve learned to not be afraid of our stove.

For those who think I’m sacrificing myself for Eric, know that he does most of the cooking, often having dinner ready when I come home late from work. He also suffers through many episodes of “House Hunters” on HGTV. He does things I like, just as I make sandwiches he likes, because that’s what a couple does. These aren’t sacrifices. They are what you do when you enjoy seeing the person you love happy.

Eric is the type of guy that at least deserved one sandwich. And I’m the kind of woman that wanted to make him one.

I’m no less of a woman because I decided to make him 300 after a flip joke.

I'm very much a You Do You type of person. If that's what Stephanie enjoys, making sandwiches for her man and taking pictures of it, good for her. No one is saying she's less of a woman for it. She absolutely has the right to make a blog about whatever she wants. But why does it require a blog to learn those things about each other? Couldn't you just learn those things about each other by dating and interacting like normal human beings?

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I totally sympathize with her for the whole "you interpreted my boyfriend wrong!" thing. I frequently leave out details when describing people that I thought I had left in, so when I get to something they did that makes sense in context, an audience can get very WTF about it. In this situation, she thought she left in the notion that her boyfriend is a nice guy; so that we would know that the "you've been up for 15 minutes, why haven't you made me a sandwich?" was said ironically.