I love YA literature. I love discussing YA literature even more. Now that I have posting privileges (yay!) I'm going to try to write about the books I read so I can talk about them to the most awesome people ever -you guys!

I am an avid library user and SIX HUGE BOOKS JUST CAME IN AT ONCE (see pic!), so I am reading in overdrive now. I decided to read "The Fault in Our Stars" by John Green first because it has the longest hold list.

I know I am a little late to the game with this book, but like I said, this book has an enormous hold list. Okay, enough with the excuses.

Plot Summary/Review (no spoilers here):

The story follows Hazel, a 16 year old cancer patient who has to constantly be attached to her oxygen tank named Phillip. She dropped out of high school three years ago when the doctors thought she wouldn't live any longer. She hung on, but she knows her death is coming soon.

Advertisement

Hazel spends most of her time at home or at the local community college, and once a week she attends a comically depressing cancer support group. At the support group she meets Augustus, who is in remission. He is there supporting Isaac, who is about to undergo a surgery that will leave him blind.

Hazel and Augustus instantly click and their romance blooms.

I like to judge books by how hard they are to put down. Some books -for instance, many classics- I would say are quote unquote good, but I need to take so many breaks while reading them.

Advertisement

I could not put this book down. Even though I knew there was no way that there was going to be a happy ending. I had to keep reading, which is pretty much the best thing I can say about a book.

My recommendation: Read it before the movie comes out and be prepared to cry on every page.

SPOILER ALERT SPOILER ALERT- My Thoughts:

I really like the Author's Note in the beginning that told readers that the book is fiction and not too look for facts in the story, that "such efforts attack the very idea that made-up stories can matter." I had never thought of it like that and I felt guilty because I often do look for facts in fiction.

Advertisement

I felt like Green overused foreshadowing, especially at the end of chapters. For instance "I never took another picture of him" and "that was the last good day I had with Gus until the Last Good Day" were both ends to chapters. They worked emotionally and made me sob harder, but I got tired of them quickly.

I thought the bits with the author Van Houten, especially at the end where he actually went to Gus' funeral, were hokey. I just don't believe he would feel that bad about the things he said. So what his assistant left and he feels alone. Lidewij said he paid a lot; I'm sure he would have no problem finding another one.

As cute as the romance was, I felt like they clicked "too well". It was way to meet-cute for me. It seemed to go too perfectly (well, besides all that cancer stuff). If you took out the cancer bits, the (remaining 5 pages of the) story would seem like something I wrote in middle school: the perfect romance with no conflicts.

Advertisement

Side note: I laughed about the part where Augustus says that all 17 year olds with one leg are virgins because I recently met a really good looking 18 year old (I know, I felt dirty) who has only one leg. The fact that he only has one leg made me want to do him even more. Sorry if that's fetichizing the disabled, those are just my (extremely horny) feelings.

What do people think about the movie coming out? Do you think it'll do the book justice? Do you think it'll transfer well to the screen?