For those following what happened with the Market Basket—a real victory for the will of the workers and something that needs to resonate on some level about how we should be doing business in America— you might like this article

Thomas Kochan, an MIT business professor, wrote in a column for Fortune magazine's website that said the Market Basket workers' victory is at least the biggest labor story of the year.

"This broad-based revolt defied all traditional doctrines in labor-management relations, labor law and corporate governance," he said.

He also predicted the Market Basket story would "go down in both business and labor history as a pivotal, perhaps historic event."

The most vocal Market Basket protesters knew that. Some mentioned how unusual their plan was, and how any professional adviser probably wouldn't recommend it, and the employee website We Are Market Basket addressed that aspect in a posting the day the employee walkout began in July.

"What we are doing is unprecedented so therefore we have no blueprint to follow or business-school lesson to refer to," the website said. "Some may think we are naive, and maybe we are. Perhaps that naiveté works in our favor as it allows us to believe that what we are doing is not only right but also achievable.

"We hope to become the precedent, the blueprint and the business-school lesson," it added.

And this:

The lesson from Market Basket, UMass Lowell business professor Scott Latham said, is that labor is often closer to the customer than management is, and it deserves a seat at the table.

"In the wake of this, as a strategy professor, in my class now, I will ask managers and executives, 'Would your employees fight for you if you were dismissed?'" Latham said. "If the answer is no, then it's time to look in the mirror."

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