I was PubMedding and I came across this: Can an angry woman get ahead? Status conferral, gender, and expression of emotion in the workplace.

Abstract

Three studies examined the relationships among anger, gender, and status conferral. As in prior research, men who expressed anger in a professional context were conferred higher status than men who expressed sadness. However, both male and female evaluators conferred lower status on angry female professionals than on angry male professionals. This was the case regardless of the actual occupational rank of the target, such that both a female trainee and a female CEO were given lower status if they expressed anger than if they did not. Whereas women’s emotional reactions were attributed to internal characteristics (e.g., “she is an angry person,””she is out of control”), men’s emotional reactions were attributed to external circumstances. Providing an external attribution for the target person’s anger eliminated the gender bias. Theoretical implications and practical applications are discussed.

In other news, I went to a conference last weekend and met someone who was starting up a postdoc that I’d applied for a few years ago. I also have seen several announcements from a particular research council about previous postdoc grant recipients who are publishing. Couldn’t help but notice . . . they were all male. I’m sure it’s TOTALLY a coincidence. (The guy I just met had an interesting research topic, and the other men I’ve known who also got the grant are good scholars, so it’s not that they’re lacking inability . . . but neither are the women who weren’t selected. And I include myself there, because when it comes down to it and I ignore the lying voices in my head that tell me I’m not good enough because I’m not perfect, I know I’m damn good and my research is damn good.) Sigh. This is why I’m happy to have the job I do and the boss I do. I was starting to internalize my lack of opportunity in Academia way too much. I’m now in a supportive atmosphere.