All the triggers of course. Assault/Rape/Sexual Violence.

As in most of these cases, the writer has to devote most of her time to defending her choices, her profession, and the entirely legitimate fear of professional reprisal. Millions of women can explain millions of time why they don’t ‘just call the cops’ but willfully dumb people will just keep on asking willfully dumb questions.

A few people with whom I’ve shared this story over the years have asked me why I didn’t call the police as soon as it happened, or publicly speak up about it shortly thereafter. The reason for that is because people—including the police—tend to believe that sex workers have placed themselves in harm’s way, and therefore can’t be assaulted.... In turn, sex workers are silenced and our negative experiences are swept under the rug as we try to protect ourselves from the judgment of others—or worse, a variety of problems ranging from further physical attacks to professional issues such as slander and/or blacklisting.

The article doesn’t add much new for most of us, but it’s all worth saying again and again. It also made me realize that Taormino’s True Lust looks awful lonely on my bookshelf. Does anyone have any recommendation of any books by porn performers/directors/et al.? I was a bit sad to see Stoya hadn’t written a book/memoir/essay collection yet.