Hi yall, sorry for my nonparticipatory nonparticipation recently. Work got... weird, and it’s taking some processing. In short, my boss quit abruptly (like, sent us an email at 2:30 in the afternoon before leaving that day at 5), which was like ...what? he’s the fucking managing director in a tiny company, what the hell? So it turns out that the Big Larger Parent company, over in Norway, has decided to streamline us into a sales production line, which means that all the actual science in the form of research and business development has been set on fire. Which means that 70 percent of my job is gone, leaving behind 30% of boring technician-grade shit that is seasonal only, and that’s if they can even admit to themselves that they need to keep a lab running. Apparently they haven’t. Hahahahahaha *cry*. Yay, all that R&D was why I was hired in the first place and why I took the job.

So my first thought was to take it slow and not make any hasty decisions. No one has yet told me that I’m redundant or anything, and Norway is slow to make any kind of decision ever, so it’s not like my paycheque is at immediate risk. HOWEVER, the slow decision-making, constantly changed stories, rumors, and pullback from cutting edge research on Norway’s behalf is increasingly making the company here in Scotland look like a total asshole in front of customers and collaborators. I’ve weathered that for about six weeks and it’s (a) driving me crazy and (b) making me look bad, in terms of my personal professional development. Plus anyone with any sense could look at my reduced job description and realize they can get someone to do what they need for like half the price and half the qualification.

So what’s up now... we’re coming up on the busy season, yahoo. :/ I could give notice right now and skip out ahead of the season, screwing the company. Tempting! Also not unlikely, since I have some applications out including a postdoc I’m due to hear about next month. Or, I could wait til after the summer, not screwing the company and taking plenty of time to train an assistant who would become my much cheaper replacement. Which brings me to hiring! I had this wonderful idea that I was going to hire someone who desperately needed the leg up as a first career job, preferably someone with no connections and who was worthy of every affirmative action I could think of. And - I have a grand total of three applicants, one of whom is American and has never heard of a migration visa (cry/scream/laugh), and the best candidate is turning out to be a go-get-em white guy.

Anyway. I need a new job. I also need to do some hiring. I’m annoyed at all of it.

UPDATES.

Update: aaaaaand I’ve just learned that the postdoc grant was denied, for reasons that are enTIREly justifiable (they were things I was worried about from getting out of the gate), although the PI is spitting mad. I mean, I was in two minds about it, but it still sucks to be rejected.

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Career stuff lately:
-Got recruited for an industry R&D job in this field, they failed to specify it was in an adjacent field that I’m not already an expert in though I’m close, but they clearly want someone with the contacts already from the adjacency. (That would have been... really really easy to put on the job description, but okay?) Have not heard a yes or no from them but it isn’t like I’m holding my breath about it. I was also not impressed at the interviewer.
-Got recruited for the same fucking job by a different recruiter. Impress level decreased further.
-Got told by colleague in the know to send application to key new player in the field, sent, turns out that said key new player is also in a bit of turmoil and ignoring all applications despite their stated eagerness a couple of months ago.
-Another university PI and whole freaking business-research collab arm is super excited about my shit, but I cannot get the industry to be excited about my shit, since they are convinced (based on stuff they’ve made up inside their heads) that my shit does not exist. Sorry. Vague. Too specific and therefor doxxy. Basically I’m telling them why a specific phenomenon might be causing or contributing to a major disease process and how I can help fix it in immediate terms AND improve the fix long term via a dedicated data collation, but they think that said specific phenomenon does not exist, because it has not yet walked into their offices and shat on them.

The end.