I had my big interview up in San Francisco on Friday. It was um, interesting.

I initially applied to the job because it sounded similar to what I did for the TV station I used to work for. I know that MLB.com has a lot of streaming content, and I figured online programming works the same-ish way as broadcast programming, so why not.

So, I have my interview, and the position doesn't actually sound that similar at all. I also thought I would be working on a lot of baseball-related content (because MLB duh), but the job wouldn't actually involve a lot of baseball. My interviewer, who was pretty chill, for the record, explained that Sony (yeah, that Sony) is trying to get into the streaming content business a la Hulu, Netflix, etc. and has teamed up with the MLB's media division to I guess piggyback on their streaming capabilities. This combination of players seemed kind of random to me, but whatever. As the interviewer was explaining the position, I thought it sounded like it would be better suited to someone with a more computer software-oriented background. I said as much, and the guy said I didn't need to know that much about computers, and apparently he himself has a degree in film production. To be honest, his description of the job and its objectives contained a lot of abstraction and buzzwords, which I'm not a big fan of (I'm so not into techno startup bullshit).

At any rate, I'm not sure I want to hold my breath on this one. I mean, I'm still interested and I wouldn't turn down a job offer from them, but I honestly don't think I'm qualified for this one. I'm still flattered and a bit shocked they thought I was worth interviewing for the position, but yeah, there's no way I'm going to get this. Oh well, at least I got to visit San Francisco for the first time and see a bit of downtown.