By Rich Juzwiak, at least, especially when she identifies as bisexual?


Hip-hop's traditionally overt homophobia—it's the musical genre in which anti-gay sentiments and slurs are most prevalent and acceptable—makes it a good gauge for social progress. And it is progressing, partly because it couldn't get much worse. Last year Frank Ocean, an R&B singer with close ties to the young L.A. rap crew OFWGKTA, made public a same-sex romantic relationship, and a new wave of sub-mainstream queer rappers such as Le1f, Mykki Blanco, and Cakes Da Killa provided new models for queerness in hip-hop, not to mention fodder for think-pieces. Established, well-respected rappers (many of whom had expressed homophobic sentiment on record at some point in the past) like Busta Rhymes, Jay Z, and T.I., spoke up to announce support of Ocean and Barack Obama's endorsement of gay marriage.

I think it's notable how much press Frank Ocean gets and how much he talks about other queer rappers, notably excluding Azealia Banks, except to characterize her as perceiving herself as an ally.

The person could think of him or herself as so down with the community that he or she feels the same kind of ownership over this word that gays do (it's rare but it happens, see Azealia Banks).


I'm not defending her language (as she used a word mostly applied to male homosexuals) but to act like she's an outsider seems to be the same kind of bisexual erasure that always happens. And she's not a "gay icon like Madonna", who is just a straight woman acting like a sexual tourist—why is she considered such?

I guess for me what was striking was how much this article was written about Macklemore and the whole relationship between Hip Hop and Queer sexuality and not a word about the fact that Azealia has been very publicly out. Why is Macklemore considered important and she gets barely a mention?


Anyone have a different opinion who wants to enlighten me about something i might be missing?