Well, this article has a delightfully misleading headline: The 24 Words That Are Most Known To Only Men Or Women. I could be mistaken, but I feel only means exclusively. Not "known mostly to men, but women know them too" or vice-versa.

I'm not sure this study means much, or really tells us anything new. But, it was kind of interesting.

Center director Mark Brysbaery looked at the first 500,000 results of the Ghent University's online vocabulary test (Editors note: you can take the test at the link. Some of the fake words are pretty funny), focusing on differences in gender. Some words exhibited a large margin between the percent of men and women who reported knowing them.

....

Here are the words that men were most likely to recognize over women:

  • codec (88, 48)
  • solenoid (87, 54)
  • golem (89, 56)
  • mach (93, 63)
  • humvee (88, 58)
  • claymore (87, 589
  • scimitar (86, 58)
  • kevlar (93, 65)
  • paladin (93, 66)
  • bolshevism (85, 60)
  • biped (86, 61)
  • dreadnought (90, 66)

And here are the words that women were most likely to know over men:

  • taffeta (48, 87)
  • tresses (61, 93)
  • bottlebrush (58, 89)
  • flouncy (55, 86)
  • mascarpone (60, 90)
  • decoupage (56, 86)
  • progesterone (63, 92)
  • wisteria (61, 89)
  • taupe (66, 93)
  • flouncing (67, 94)
  • peony (70, 96)
  • bodice (71, 96)

Some commentors on /r/linguistics are offering suggestions for these differences, such as "User drmacj brought up the massive variability present in adult vocabulary, regardless of gender. Culture, location, and education play significant roles. 'And not to mention these words only apply in a very limited socioeconomic context,' user hoochie_minh wrote."